Abbadia d'Ombrone

Abbazia di Vallombrosa

Villa Arceno

Bardini Garden in Florence

Bernard Berenson

Boboli's Gardens

Il parco dei Mostri di Bomarzo

Villa Bottini

Castello di Brolio

Villa Cahen

Villa della Capponcina

Villa Capponi

Villa Medici at Careggi

Villa di Catignano

Cecil Ross Pinsent

Castello di Celsa

Villa Certano Baldassarrini

Certosa di Pontignano

Villa di Cetinale

Villa Chigi Saracini

Villa Farnese (Caprarola)

Gardens in Fiesole

Villa Gamberaia

Villa Garzoni in Collodi

Villa di Geggiano

Villa Grabau

Villa Guicciardini Corsi Salviati

Horti Leonini di San Quirico

Villa I Collazzi, Firenze

Iris Origo

L'Orto de'Pecci (Siena)


Villa I Tatti

Villa Medicea La Ferdinanda

Villa La Foce

Villa La Gallina in Arcetri

Villa Lante

Villa La Petraia

Villa La Pietra

Villa La Suverana in Casole d'Elsa

The Medici Villa at Careggi

Villa Medici in Fiesole, Firenze

Garden of Palazzo Medici-Riccardi in Firenze

Villa Medicea at Poggio a Caiano

Medici Villas in Tuscany

Villa di Monaciano

Giardino degli Orti Oricellari | Firenze

Orto Botanico, Siena

Villa Orlandini in Poggio Torselli

Il Palazzone

Villa Palmieri and Villa Schifanoiai

Villa Peyron al Bosco di Fontelucente

Palazzo Piccolomini in Pienza

Villa di Pratolino

Villa Reale di Marlia

Villa San Donato in Colle (Bagno a Ripoli)

Villa Santini Torrigiani

Villa di Vicobello

Villa Vistarenni

Il Vittoriale degli Italiani


 
Gardens in Tuscany
             
 
Villa La Suvera in Casole d'Elsa

album Surroundings
       
   

Villa La Suverana in Casole d'Elsa

   
   

Villa La Suverana is situated in Maggiano, a frazione of Casole d'Elsa.
The first records of the building date back to 1138, when it was the property of the powerful Longobard family, the Ardengheschi.
In the mid-16th century, Pope Julius II (Giuliano della Rovere) received the villa as a gift from Pandolfo Petrucci, lord of the Republic of Siena. The pope ordered that what was then an austere fortress be transformed into a splendid Renaissance villa, surrounded by a large park, and the famous Sienese architectect Baldassarre Peruzzi was commissioned to carry out the plan. The present owners, the Ricci marquises, have now turned the villa into a five-star country hotel.
The grounds have several interesting features: a large courtyard to the north, with a fine 18th-century ironwork aviary at its centre; an Italian-style garden adorned with potted lemon trees; and another garden to the south with a lily pool; a wood of holm-oaks crossed by winding paths is also part of the estate.
Set around a picturesque courtyard, the Renaissance villa is the heart of a borgo which has developed over the centuries, with a consecrated church dedicated to Saint Carlo Borromeo in the 1400's with interiors that reflect 18th century tastes. A few later buildings complete the complex which is surrounded by a park with Italian formal gardens dating back to the 18th century.

The term suvera is a corruption of the French noun souveraine, or sovereign. The first records of the building date back to 1138, when it was the property of the powerful Longobard family, the Ardengheschi. In the mid-16th century, Pope Julius II (Giuliano della Rovere) received the villa as a gift from Pandolfo Petrucci, lord of the Republic of Siena. The pope ordered that what was then an austere fortress be transformed into a splendid Renaissance villa, surrounded by a large park, and the famous Sienese architectect Baldassarre Peruzzi was commissioned to carry out the plan. After Niccolò della Rovere, nephew of Julius II, the villa became the property of the Chigi family of Siena then changed hands several times again and was eventually bought by the present owners, the Ricci marquises, who have now turned it into a five-star country hotel. The grounds have several interesting features: a large courtyard to the north, with a fine 18th-century ironwork aviary at its centre; an Italian-style garden adorned with potted lemon trees; and another garden to the south with a lily pool; a wood of holm-oaks crossed by winding paths is also part of the estate.

History

The origins of La Suvera go back to the High Middle Ages as the Castle of the County of Siena ruled by the legendary Countess Ava Matilde dé Franzesi, a relation of the King of France Clovis, also known as the Queen of Montemaggio. It is therefore likely that the ancient name La Suvera derives from the French "Souveraine", meaning Sovereign.

This county reached the peak of its glory under the rule of the powerful Ardengheschi family, Longobards, descendents of Ardengo, Charlemagne's Palatine Count. Later La Suvera passed into the hands of others in episodes of alternate good fortune and ill luck but finishing with the Republic of Siena gifting it to Pope Julius II, who wished to win the Pope's favour.

This Renaissance Pope, a highly political and militant ruler, is far better known as Raffaello's patron who commissioned rooms in the Vatican, and Michelangelo's for the Sistine Chapel, and for having commissioned Bramante to build the new Basilica of St. Peter's. He entrusted La Suvera to the genius of Baldassarre Peruzzi, who blended the medieval severity of the medieval fortress with the sumptuous luxury of the Renaissance to create the villa as we know it today.

La Suvera passed through inheritance to Pope Julius' nephew Niccolò della Rovere and from there it went to the Chigi family from Siena and later, through marriage, inheritance and acquisition it came into the current owners' hands, the family of the Marquis Ricci, who had in fact owned it before, as a deed of the Notary records of Siena testifies, as long ago as 1123.

Marquis Giuseppe Ricci Paracciani and his wife Princess Eleonora Massimo have turned their home into an extraordinary five star country hotel for guests seeking true culture. They have combined the stories of the historical site with stories of their own well known ancestors, relics of whom furnish the suites and rooms which have been created for the utmost pleasure of their guests and in order to satisfy their natural curiosity.

The Papal Villa today is the heart of a borgo which has developed over the centuries, with a consecrated church dedicated to Saint Carlo Borromeo in the 1400's with interiors that reflect 18th century tastes. A few later buildings complete the complex which is surrounded by a park with Italian formal gardens dating back to the 18th century.

   
   
Villa San Chimento

 
 

This villa, built in the late 16th century by the Accarigi family, is an imposing two-storey building with a fine portico at the centre of the main front, in front of which is a terrace which is reached by a broad polygonal flight of steps. Adjoining the building is an attractive Italian-style garden, set out with circular flower-beds edged with box hedges and crossed by a winding path. Inside the property is an ancient oil press that is still in use.

 
 

 

 
 
   


Colle di Val d'Elsa
Monterriggioni
San Gimignano,
view from Rocca di Montestaffoli

Colle di Val d'Elsa


Gardens in Tuscany | Italian villas and their gardens


Baldassarre Peruzzi (1481-1536) was anItalian architect and painter of the Roman school, was born at Ancajano, in the diocese of Volterra, and passed his early life at Siena, where his father resided. While quite young Peruzzi went to Rome, and there studied architecture and painting; in the latter he was at first a follower of Perugino. The choir frescoes in Sant' Onofrio on the Janiculan Hill, usually attributed to Pinturicchio, are by his hand. One of the first works which brought renown to the young architect was the villa on the banks of the Tiber in Rome now known as the Farnesina, originally built for the Sienese Agostino Chigi, a wealthy banker. This villa, like all Peruzzi's works, is remarkable for its graceful design and the delicacy of its detail. It is best known for the frescoes painted there by Raphael and his pupils to illustrate the stories of Psyche and Galatea. One of the loggie has frescoes by Peruzzi's own hand -- the story of Medusa. On account of his success Peruzzi was appointed by Pope Leo X in 1520 architect to St. Peter's at a salary of 250 scudi; his design for its completion was not, however, carried out. During the sack of Rome in 1527 Peruzzi barely escaped with his life, on condition of his painting the portrait of Constable de Bourbon, who had been killed during the siege. From Rome he escaped to Siena, where he was made city architect, and designed fortifications for its defense, a great part of which still exist. Soon afterwards he returned to Rome, where he made designs for a palace for the Orsini family, and built the palaces Massimi and Vidoni, as well as others in the south of Italy. He died in 1536, and was buried by the side of Raphael in the Pantheon.
Peruzzi was an eager student of mathematics and was also a fair classical scholar. Like many of the great artists of his time, he was remarkable for the varied extent of his knowledge and skill. A most able architect, a fair painter and one working in quadratura, and a scientific engineer, he also practiced minor arts, such as stucco-work in relief, sgraffito, and the decorative painted arabesques which the influence of Raphael did so much to bring into use. His best existing works in fresco are in the Castel di Belcaro and the church of Fontegiusta in Siena. For Siena Cathedral he also designed a magnificent wooden organ-case, painted and gilt, rich with carved arabesques in friezes and pilasters; he also designed the high altar and the Cappella del Battista.
His chief pupil was the architect Serlio, who, in his work on architecture, gratefully acknowledges the great debt he owed to Peruzzi's instruction. The English National Gallery possesses an interesting drawing by his hand. The subject is the "Adoration of the Magi", and it is of special value, because the heads of the three kings are portraits of Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian. The Uffizi and the library at Siena contain a number of Peruzzi's designs and drawings, many of which are now of priceless value, as they show ancient buildings which have been destroyed since the 16th century.

Villa is Tuscany


Artist and writer's residency | Podere Santa Pia



 
Podere Santa Pia
Podere Santa Pia, view from the garden
on the valley below

  Villa San Martino, Napoleon’s summer residence

Villa I Tatti
Sovicille, Pieve di San Giovanni Battistaa Ponte allo Spino

L'Orto de'Pecci